On 9 June 2019, a historic 1.03 million people took to the streets to oppose the amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance (aka "extradition law amendment bill (ELAB)"), yet the government made it clear that night that it would continue the Second Reading debate in the Legislative Council. Tens of thousands of people took to the streets on 12 June, surrounding the Central Government Offices and the Legislative Council in Admiralty, in an attempt to stop the passage of the amendment. At around 3 pm, the police dispersed protesters by force, using 240 tear gas canisters, 19 rounds of rubber bullets, 3 rounds of bean bag rounds and 30 rounds of sponge grenades. On 16 June, a historic 2 million people took to the streets again to oppose the draconian law amendment, and police brutality.

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Wan Chai
Police Station
Harcourt Garden
Pacific Place
Central
Government
Office
Admiralty Station
Legislative
Council Complex
Tamar Park
Chief Executive's
Office
Chinese PLA Forces
Hong Kong Building
Central Barracks
I'm a journalist!
Journalist my ass
Come out, mother fucker!
Liberal Cunt!
I can't breathe!
Can't get in!
Tell your Jesus Christ
to come see me!
Don't touch my behind!
If you have hallucinations,
quit law enforcement!
I am also a mother,
you also have kids,
why are you beating the kids?
That's enough, go home!
不撤回,不撤退

Conflict Timeline

June 10 Begins

The Petition Committee of Hong Kong Christian Pastors, the Pastors Concern Group, the Christian Social Concern Society, Mission Citizens and other religious organisations held a three-day prayer campaign outside the Central Government Offices from 10 to 12 June, titled “Free from the Fear of Captivity, Pray Together for the Peace of this City”. Dr John Chan Wai-on, Assistant Professor of the Alliance Bible Seminary, he was proud of the 1.03 million-large rally, but he felt helpless and sad about the government’s insistence on amending the law. He hoped that as a Christian in Hong Kong, he could pray for Hong Kong politically and awaken the conscience of officials and pro-Beijing legislators to oppose the amendment together.

×

June 11 Night

On the eve of the Second Reading, a number of organisations planned to stay outside the Legislative Council overnight. Half a hundred police officers entered the area of the Admiralty MTR Station in the evening to stop and search citizens, mainly young people and people wearing masks. Many young people had their belongings searched as soon as they left the turnstile, were asked to stand lined up at the wall of the lobby, and were not allowed to leave even after the inspection. Citizens at the scene filmed and questioned the police operations, but also had their bodies and bags searched and ID cards registered. At the McDonald's in Admiralty Centre, police officers also conducted searches on patrons.

Pan-democratic camp legislators Roy Kwong, Lam Cheuk-ting, Eddie Chu, Jeremy Tam, Alvin Yeung and others rushed to Admiralty Station to discuss with the police, questioning their criteria for stop and search, and reprimanding them for unreasonable law enforcement. As for young people being arranged to line up in front of the turnstiles despite not having been found to possess suspicious items, Hong Kong Human Rights Monitor condemned the police for abusing their power of conducting stop-and-search, unnecessarily detaining the intercepted and inflicting insulting treatment. Also, restricting personal freedom even when nothing was found after the search amounted to false imprisonment.

×

June 12, 730am

The presence of the police force around the Central Government Offices were significantly strengthened, and the junction of Harcourt Road and Tim Wa Avenue was blocked by the police with metal barriers as a precautionary measure. Special Tactical Contingent of the Police Force (Raptors) members suddenly stepped forward to intercept a citizen and pinned him to the ground, causing discontent among the people at the scene. Raptors came to drive away the crowd of onlookers and took away the intercepted man.

×

Citizens went onto the carriageway of Lung Wo Road and dragged in water-filled and metal barriers as roadblocks to disrupt traffic in both directions.

Citizens went out to Gloucester Road and Harcourt Road. Police officers dispersed them and some drivers removed the roadblocks.

8am

1

Demosistō and civil society organisations blocked the passage between Central and Hong Kong Station in the form of a "picket line", calling on the public to join the strike.

2

A large number of people occupied both bounds of the traffic lanes of Gloucester Road and Harcourt Road and set up road blocks with metal barriers and other materials. The police used pepper spray.

3

Roads were blocked with bricks around Lung Wo Road.

4

Legislators Roy Kwong and Wu Chi-wai appealed to protesters to avoid clashes with the police, as the entrances of the Legislative Council Complex had been blocked and the meeting could not be held.

×

10am

1

Police sprayed pepper-based solution on protesters at the junction of Tim Wa Avenue and Harcourt Road. Protesters guarded themselves with umbrellas.

2

A large number of police officers with guns and shields marched from the Central Piers to reinforce at the Legislative Council.

4

Some police officers entered the Legislative Council to discuss meeting arrangements with the security personnel. Some police officers were fully armed and equipped with pepper spray.

5

Legislative Council President Andrew Leung announced a change of the meeting time, but the demonstrators demanded to cancel the meeting and withdraw the amendment. They pushed forward the metal barriers. The police used pepper spray again.

6

The government announced that all entrances to the Central Government Offices had been closed due to severely clogged roads and police operations, and that civil servants were urged not to enter the building.

11am

1

Legislative Councillor Roy Kwong, who stayed overnight, fainted at Tim Mei Avenue.

×

2

Macau journalist Chan Ka-chon was pepper-sprayed by the police while covering news and rinsing himself, and suffered burns and stings on his lower limbs, back, head, arms and ears. He criticised the police for unreasonable law enforcement and for targeting journalists, which obstructed the freedom of news reporting.

×

4

The Education Bureau issued a special report, citing special traffic conditions in the Wan Chai and Central and Western districts and suggested that schools should be flexible in dealing with late arrival or absence of students.

5

The Labour Department appealed to employers to be understanding and flexible if employees were unable to return to work in time due to traffic problems.

6

The Transport Department urged the public not to drive to the Admiralty and Central areas. Over 80 bus routes of KMB, NWFB and Citybus were affected.

12pm

1

The police said that some protesters on Lung Wo Road had dug up bricks on the ground. The police warned them not to throw bricks, which is a serious offence. The police also said there were cars deliberately blocking the road along Queensway and urged people to avoid going there.

2

Cars broke down on Johnston Road, Wan Chai. A bus and a private car collided across from the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.

3

Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung released a video calling on people occupying the road to return to the pavement and the assembled citizens to remain calm and restrained and disperse peacefully. He reiterated that the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance amendment only targets fugitives who have committed serious crimes, and definitely not law-abiding citizens.

4

Pastors stood hand-in-hand between the police and the protesters at the entrance and exit of the East Wing of the Central Government Offices and the Legislative Council, hoping that the police would not use force against the students.

1pm

1

It rained heavily in Admiralty. Tens of thousands of people gathered around the Central Government Offices and the Legislative Council, forming human chains to deliver umbrellas, cable ties, gloves, helmets, water and other supplies. Confrontation with the police continued. The atmosphere was eased and there were no further clashes.

2

The police strengthened reinforcements. Long lines of police cars filled the vicinity of Harbour Road in Wan Chai.

3

The Civil Human Rights Front said that the only condition for the public to dissolve was to withdraw the amendment. It called on the public to realise the principle of "no withdrawal, no retreat".

4

The Democratic Party stated that Hong Kong had reached a very dangerous edge, and withdrawing the amendment bill was the only way to stop public anger. It also said that the Executive Council has the constitutional duty to reflect the most sincere views to the government, not to “be lackeys and fan flames”.

2pm

1

Pro-Beijing camp members left the Central Police Station in batches in a white coach and some cars. Their destination was unknown.

2

The protesters announced a "deadline" and demanded that the amendment be withdrawn by 3 pm, otherwise their action would escalate.

3

6 religious leaders, from the Hong Kong Buddhist Association, Roman Catholic Diocese of Hong Kong, Confucian Academy, The Chinese Muslim Cultural And Fraternal Association, Hong Kong Christian Council and Hong Kong Taoist Association, said that the amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance had triggered heated controversies and caused major divide in society.

They hoped that the government and the public would seek common ground despite their differences. They called on the government to respect citizens' right to participate in lawful rallies and assemblies.

3pm

1

At the junction of Tim Wa Avenue and Harcourt Road, protesters beat rhythms with hard objects and chanted slogans. Some threw water bottles and other objects at the police, others pushed forward the metal barriers. Some police officers picked up various items and threw them back at the protesters.

2

The police resorted to the continuous use of large pepper spray and pepper-based solution while people held up umbrellas to resist. The sprays affected many journalists and photographers. Some protesters stacked up metal barriers and pushed them forward. Some police officers rushed forward to wave their batons and beat the protesters. The situation was chaotic.

×

3

Outside the Legislative Council protest area, some protesters tried to break through the police defence line. The police used pepper spray as the protesters resisted with umbrellas and set up a defence line with metal barriers. A police officer sneak-attacked the reporters from behind and from height, spraying pepper spray at close range. Most of the reporters wore yellow reflective vests and helmets with the word "PRESS" on them, and had filming equipment in their hands.

7

A police officer was injured and sent to the Legislative Council Complex, where he was treated by his fellow officers.

8

The crowd around Tim Mei Avenue, Legislative Council Road and Lung Wui Road rushed to the area in front of the CITIC Tower, in an effort to evade the tear gas. There were only a revolving door that barely turned and a small door open. As hundreds of people attempted to crowd into the lobby of CITIC Tower through those doors, police threw tear gas into the centre of the crowd. The Civil Human Rights Front was holding a rally on Lung Wui Road and had been given a Letter of No Objection. Tear gas spread and rose within the crowd, who found themselves too packed to move. It affected everyone's eyes and noses; everyone felt almost suffocated; cries and screams lingering in their ears. Finding no way forward and cops chasing from behind, they only felt painful, anxious, panic, and disoriented.

×

4pm

1

7 former officials had a joint petition, including the former Secretary for Labour and Welfare, Stephen Sui Wai-keung; the former Deputy Secretary for Transport and Housing, Mr Yau Shing-mu; the former Political Assistant to the Financial Secretary, Frankie Ip Kan-chuen; the Political Assistant to the Financial Secretary, Julian Law Wing-chung; the former Political Assistant to the Food and Health Bureau, Paul Chan Chi-yuen; the former Political Assistant to the Labour and Welfare Bureau, Zandra Mok Yee-tuen; and the former Political Assistant to the Environment Bureau, Linda Choy Siu-min. They said that the amendment bill was extremely controversial and urged the Chief Executive, Carrie Lam, to withdraw the proposal, give the matter further thought and discuss it later.

2

Police continued to deploy bean bag rounds and tear gas on Tim Mei Avenue, Lung Wui Road, Legislative Council Road, Tim Wa Avenue and Lung Wo Road.

8

After deploying tear gas on Tim Wa Avenue, the Raptors ran towards an unarmed man and pulled him to the ground from behind, beating him with batons and kicking him for at least 10 seconds. The beaten man used his hands to protect his head, while the other Raptors surrounded the attacking colleagues and pointed their guns and batons at the journalists.

9

At the junction of Harcourt Road and Tim Wa Avenue, unarmed Uncle Ng, who was suffering from lung cancer, was shot with a rubber bullet even without attacking the police line. He only scolded the police for their brutality. He fell down and was subsequently arrested.

14

Police Commissioner Steven Lo Wai-chung described the scene as a "disturbance", with batons, pepper spray, bean bag rounds, rubber bullets and tear gas being used as the police were forced to use them. Asked if water cannon trucks would be used, Senior Superintendent Kong Wing-cheung of the Police Public Relations Branch said, "The police will not rule out any possible options to control the situation."

×

4

Chong Man-lung, an outsourced driver for Radio Television Hong Kong, was hit by a tear gas canister in his left chest and collapsed on the spot, with his head bleeding. He was rushed to hospital unconscious and in convulsions. His heart stopped beating for about 20 seconds. The car he was driving was parked outside CITIC Tower and Chong got out of the car to take a break while the police deployed tear gas nearby.

×

15

A police officer told the people on the footbridge connecting CITIC Tower to put their hands up and leave.

11

After inhaling tear gas, the 17-year-old girl suffered from heartache, cramps in her arms and legs and shortness of breath. Off-duty nurses and other volunteer first aiders carried the girl to the pier and waited for an ambulance, but it did not arrive for 10 minutes. The girl’s condition deteriorated and she was eventually taken to hospital by a free ride.

×

16

Tear gas spread from the Legislative Council to the High Court in Admiralty and the gate had to be closed at the main entrance of the court building.

6

A male teacher of Diocesan Girls' School was shot in the right eye and was bleeding. He said, "As nothing was between the protesters and the police, some protesters moved the metal barriers to set up a defence line. The police opened fire without warning and shot me in the right eye. I am still bleeding. I don't know if my eyesight has been damaged, but I think it was a rubber bullet and I can't see out of my right eye."

12

Lots of protesters could not stand the tear gas and went to Pacific Place in Admiralty and IFC in Central for shelters.

×

17

The Hong Kong Professional Teachers' Union called for a territory-wide class boycott.

5pm

An unarmed mother stood in front of the police line and shouted at the top of her lungs, "It's enough! I've already suffered from a few of your smoke grenades! I've sacrificed a bit too. Can we just compromise? I'm not charging you, I don't have a weapon!" She begged the police for mercy but was attacked by the police at close range.

×

A large amount of tear gas entered Admiralty Station and chaos broke out inside the station. Many people asked the MTR to release the turnstiles and some jumped through the turnstiles and went to the platform. A group of police officers were stationed outside Exit C2, during which they pulled a person forward and used pepper spray inside the station. Some people argued with the police officers, who at one point banged on their shields to threaten those people.

×

The police continued to fire tear gas and kept advancing towards the area outside Harcourt Road.

A foreign man sitting next to the bushes was dispersed by police while they were dispersing the area around the City Gallery. The man said his leg hurt and he had to walk slowly, but the police officers frantically sprayed pepper-based solution on his face several times at close range.

6pm

1

The police issued an announcement with the headline "Riot" to describe the demonstration.

4

In an interview with Chief Executive Carrie Lam broadcast on TVB News, she refused to withdraw the amendment bill, saying, "I have never had any guilt because of this matter". At one point, she choked back tears as she was criticised for betraying Hong Kong, saying, "How could I have betrayed Hong Kong? My love for this place has prompted me to make many personal sacrifices."

2

East Wing Forecourt of the Central Government Offices was closed.

5

The Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF) strongly condemns the police for violently attacking protesters with lethal weapons such as tear gas, bean bag rounds and rubber rounds, causing many people to be injured and even unconscious. It also said that that day's protest was caused by the fact that Carrie Lam ignored the 1.03 million people who took to the streets. She refused to withdraw the extradition law amendment bill, which provoked public anger.

3

Pan-democratic camp members were informed by the Legislative Council Secretariat that no meeting of the Legislative Council would be held that day.

6

Vehicles on Des Voeux Road Central and Connaught Road Central "broke down" and obstructed the traffic. A sticker that read "against being sent to China" was posted on a towing vehicle.

×

7

MTR said starting from 6:45 pm, Exits B, C, C1 and D of Admiralty Station would only be for entry only and Exit A remained closed.

7pm

Ten tertiary institution principals issued a joint statement, expressing great concern about the escalating confrontation and tensions in the community, and calling on all parties to remain calm and to resolve the current dilemma through rational negotiation.

2

The Education Bureau expressed its strong opposition to student strikes and walkouts initiated by educational groups, and reiterated that schools should not be used as a venue to express political demands.

3

The HKJA strongly condemned the government for disregarding public opinion and refusing to withdraw the extradition law amendment bill which triggered a confrontation between the police and the public, and caused many injuries.

8pm

Teddy Tang, Chairman of the Hong Kong Association of the Heads of Secondary Schools, said that student strikes were expected to happen the next day, and was confident that schools would handle students' demand for strike flexibly. Tang added that the development of the situation had worsened the problem of social confrontation and called on the government to suspend the legislation to listen to public opinion.

In a televised speech, Carrie Lam mentioned the "riots" three times, saying, "These acts of rioting, which damage social peace and disregard the law, are intolerable in any civilised society that respects the rule of law. Clearly, this is no longer a peaceful assembly but a blatant, organised riot, and in no way an act of loving Hong Kong." Strongly condemning the incident, Carrie Lam did not respond to the public demand for the withdrawal of the extradition bill.

×

10pm

Police dispersed protesters in Admiralty as protesters moved their battle lines to Central. People gathered in Murray Road, Central, while others occupied Pedder Street and Connaught Road Central.

The Hong Kong Public Doctors' Association and the Frontline Doctors' Union had issued a joint statement condemning the police for their handling of the demonstration and expressing their extreme dissatisfaction and distress. The statement directly pointed out that the government did not stop to listen to the voices of the public, which urged the public to express their views in the Legislative Council. The joint statement also criticised police brutality on the matter. As the atmosphere of the assembly became tense at the early stage, the police handled the demonstration using disproportionate, excessive force and tear gas to the protesters. The police used weapons such as bean bag rounds and rubber bullets, and even aimed to shoot at the heads of the protesters and journalists.

11pm

17 former IPCC members, including 2 former IPCC chairmen, Jat Sew-tong and Larry Kwok Lam-kwong, issued a joint statement urging the police and protesters to exercise restraint to avoid casualties.

The Hong Kong Journalists Association (HKJA) received 15 complaints that the police had obstructed news coverage and ignored them even after identifying themselves. HKJA urgently called on the Chief Executive to intervene.

June 13

Queensway was fully open at 5:40 am.

The eastbound lanes of Harcourt Road were fully open at 7:45 am.

After an 18-hour shutdown, Admiralty Station was reopened at 2:20 pm.

The Hospital Authority said at 5 pm that 81 people aged 15 to 66 were injured and sought medical attention at A&E of 7 hospitals, with 2 men in serious condition at one point.

On 9 June 2019, a historic 1.03 million people took to the streets of Hong Kong to oppose the amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance (also known unofficially as "extradition law amendment bill (ELAB)"), yet the government made it clear that night that it would continue the Second Reading debate in the Legislative Council. Tens of thousands of people took to the streets on 12 June, surrounding the Central Government Offices and the Legislative Council in Admiralty, in an attempt to stop the passage of the amendment. At around 3 pm, the police dispersed protesters by force, using 240 tear gas canisters, 19 rounds of rubber bullets, 3 rounds of bean bag rounds and 30 rounds of sponge grenades. On 16 June, a historic 2 million people took to the streets again to oppose the draconian law amendment, and police brutality.

June 10 Begins

The Petition Committee of Hong Kong Christian Pastors, the Pastors Concern Group, the Christian Social Concern Society, Mission Citizens and other religious organisations held a three-day prayer campaign outside the Central Government Offices from 10 to 12 June, titled "Free from the Fear of Captivity, Pray Together for the Peace of this City". Dr John Chan Wai-on, Assistant Professor of the Alliance Bible Seminary, he was proud of the 1.03 million-large rally, but he felt helpless and sad about the government's insistence on amending the law. He hoped that as a Christian in Hong Kong, he could pray for Hong Kong politically and awaken the conscience of officials and pro-Beijing legislators to oppose the amendment together.

June 11 Night

On the eve of the Second Reading, a number of organisations planned to stay outside the Legislative Council overnight. Half a hundred police officers entered the area of the Admiralty MTR Station in the evening to stop and search citizens, mainly young people and people wearing masks. Many young people had their belongings searched as soon as they left the turnstile, were asked to stand lined up at the wall of the lobby, and were not allowed to leave even after the inspection. Citizens at the scene filmed and questioned the police operations, but also had their bodies and bags searched and ID cards registered. At the McDonald's in Admiralty Centre, police officers also conducted searches on patrons.

June 12, 730am

Citizens went onto the carriageway of Lung Wo Road and dragged in water-filled and metal barriers as roadblocks to disrupt traffic in both directions.

Citizens went out to Gloucester Road and Harcourt Road. Police officers dispersed them and some drivers removed the roadblocks.

8am

Demosistō and civil society organisations blocked the passage between Central and Hong Kong Station in the form of a "picket line", calling on the public to join the strike.

A large number of people occupied both bounds of the traffic lanes of Gloucester Road and Harcourt Road and set up road blocks with metal barriers and other materials. The police used pepper spray.

Roads were blocked with bricks around Lung Wo Road.

Legislators Roy Kwong and Wu Chi-wai appealed to protesters to avoid clashes with the police, as the entrances of the Legislative Council Complex had been blocked and the meeting could not be held.

10am

Police sprayed pepper-based solution on protesters at the junction of Tim Wa Avenue and Harcourt Road. Protesters guarded themselves with umbrellas.

A large number of police officers with guns and shields marched from the Central Piers to reinforce at the Legislative Council.

Some police officers entered the Legislative Council to discuss meeting arrangements with the security personnel. Some police officers were fully armed and equipped with pepper spray.

Legislative Council President Andrew Leung announced a change of the meeting time, but the demonstrators demanded to cancel the meeting and withdraw the amendment. They pushed forward the metal barriers. The police used pepper spray again.

The government announced that all entrances to the Central Government Offices had been closed due to severely clogged roads and police operations, and that civil servants were urged not to enter the building.

11am

The Education Bureau issued a special report, citing special traffic conditions in the Wan Chai and Central and Western districts and suggested that schools should be flexible in dealing with late arrival or absence of students.

The Labour Department appealed to employers to be understanding and flexible if employees were unable to return to work in time due to traffic problems.

The Transport Department urged the public not to drive to the Admiralty and Central areas. Over 80 bus routes of KMB, NWFB and Citybus were affected.

12pm

The police said that some protesters on Lung Wo Road had dug up bricks on the ground. The police warned them not to throw bricks, which is a serious offence. The police also said there were cars deliberately blocking the road along Queensway and urged people to avoid going there.

Cars broke down on Johnston Road, Wan Chai. A bus and a private car collided across from the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Pastors stood hand-in-hand between the police and the protesters at the entrance and exit of the East Wing of the Central Government Offices and the Legislative Council, hoping that the police would not use force against the students.

1pm

It rained heavily in Admiralty. Tens of thousands of people gathered around the Central Government Offices and the Legislative Council, forming human chains to deliver umbrellas, cable ties, gloves, helmets, water and other supplies. Confrontation with the police continued. The atmosphere was eased and there were no further clashes.

The police strengthened reinforcements. Long lines of police cars filled the vicinity of Harbour Road in Wan Chai.

The Civil Human Rights Front said that the only condition for the public to dissolve was to withdraw the amendment. It called on the public to realise the principle of "no withdrawal, no retreat".

The Democratic Party stated that Hong Kong had reached a very dangerous edge, and withdrawing the amendment bill was the only way to stop public anger. It also said that the Executive Council has the constitutional duty to reflect the most sincere views to the government, not to "be lackeys and fan flames".

2pm

Pro-Beijing camp members left the Central Police Station in batches in a white coach and some cars. Their destination was unknown.

The protesters announced a "deadline" and demanded that the amendment be withdrawn by 3 pm, otherwise their action would escalate.

6 religious leaders, from the Hong Kong Buddhist Association, Roman Catholic Diocese of Hong Kong, Confucian Academy, The Chinese Muslim Cultural And Fraternal Association, Hong Kong Christian Council and Hong Kong Taoist Association, said that the amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance had triggered heated controversies and caused major divide in society. They hoped that the government and the public would seek common ground despite their differences. They called on the government to respect citizens' right to participate in lawful rallies and assemblies.

3pm

At the junction of Tim Wa Avenue and Harcourt Road, protesters beat rhythms with hard objects and chanted slogans. Some threw water bottles and other objects at the police, others pushed forward the metal barriers. Some police officers picked up various items and threw them back at the protesters.

A police officer was injured and sent to the Legislative Council Complex, where he was treated by his fellow officers.

4pm

7 former officials had a joint petition, including the former Secretary for Labour and Welfare, Stephen Sui Wai-keung; the former Deputy Secretary for Transport and Housing, Mr Yau Shing-mu; the former Political Assistant to the Financial Secretary, Frankie Ip Kan-chuen; the Political Assistant to the Financial Secretary, Julian Law Wing-chung; the former Political Assistant to the Food and Health Bureau, Paul Chan Chi-yuen; the former Political Assistant to the Labour and Welfare Bureau, Zandra Mok Yee-tuen; and the former Political Assistant to the Environment Bureau, Linda Choy Siu-min. They said that the amendment bill was extremely controversial and urged the Chief Executive, Carrie Lam, to withdraw the proposal, give the matter further thought and discuss it later.

Police continued to deploy bean bag rounds and tear gas on Tim Mei Avenue, Lung Wui Road, Legislative Council Road, Tim Wa Avenue and Lung Wo Road.

After inhaling tear gas, the 17-year-old girl suffered from heartache, cramps in her arms and legs and shortness of breath. Off-duty nurses and other volunteer first aiders carried the girl to the pier and waited for an ambulance, but it did not arrive for 10 minutes. The girl's condition deteriorated and she was eventually taken to hospital by a free ride.

Lots of protesters could not stand the tear gas and went to Pacific Place in Admiralty and IFC in Central for shelters.

Police Commissioner Steven Lo Wai-chung described the scene as a "disturbance", with batons, pepper spray, bean bag rounds, rubber bullets and tear gas being used as the police were forced to use them. Asked if water cannon trucks would be used, Senior Superintendent Kong Wing-cheung of the Police Public Relations Branch said, "The police will not rule out any possible options to control the situation."

A police officer told the people on the footbridge connecting CITIC Tower to put their hands up and leave.

Tear gas spread from the Legislative Council to the High Court in Admiralty and the gate had to be closed at the main entrance of the court building.

The Hong Kong Professional Teachers' Union called for a territory-wide class boycott.

5pm

The police continued to fire tear gas and kept advancing towards the area outside Harcourt Road.

6pm

The police issued an announcement with the headline "Riot" to describe the demonstration.

East Wing Forecourt of the Central Government Offices was closed.

Pan-democratic camp members were informed by the Legislative Council Secretariat that no meeting of the Legislative Council would be held that day.

The Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF) strongly condemns the police for violently attacking protesters with lethal weapons such as tear gas, bean bag rounds and rubber rounds, causing many people to be injured and even unconscious. It also said that that day's protest was caused by the fact that Carrie Lam ignored the 1.03 million people who took to the streets. She refused to withdraw the extradition law amendment bill, which provoked public anger.

MTR said starting from 6:45 pm, Exits B, C, C1 and D of Admiralty Station would only be for entry only and Exit A remained closed.

7pm

Ten tertiary institution principals issued a joint statement, expressing great concern about the escalating confrontation and tensions in the community, and calling on all parties to remain calm and to resolve the current dilemma through rational negotiation.

The Education Bureau expressed its strong opposition to student strikes and walkouts initiated by educational groups, and reiterated that schools should not be used as a venue to express political demands.

The HKJA strongly condemned the government for disregarding public opinion and refusing to withdraw the extradition law amendment bill which triggered a confrontation between the police and the public, and caused many injuries.

8pm

Teddy Tang, Chairman of the Hong Kong Association of the Heads of Secondary Schools, said that student strikes were expected to happen the next day, and was confident that schools would handle students' demand for strike flexibly. Tang added that the development of the situation had worsened the problem of social confrontation and called on the government to suspend the legislation to listen to public opinion.

10pm

Police dispersed protesters in Admiralty as protesters moved their battle lines to Central. People gathered in Murray Road, Central, while others occupied Pedder Street and Connaught Road Central.

The Hong Kong Public Doctors' Association and the Frontline Doctors' Union had issued a joint statement condemning the police for their handling of the demonstration and expressing their extreme dissatisfaction and distress. The statement directly pointed out that the government did not stop to listen to the voices of the public, which urged the public to express their views in the Legislative Council. The joint statement also criticised police brutality on the matter. As the atmosphere of the assembly became tense at the early stage, the police handled the demonstration using disproportionate, excessive force and tear gas to the protesters. The police used weapons such as bean bag rounds and rubber bullets, and even aimed to shoot at the heads of the protesters and journalists.

11pm

17 former IPCC members, including 2 former IPCC chairmen, Jat Sew-tong and Larry Kwok Lam-kwong, issued a joint statement urging the police and protesters to exercise restraint to avoid casualties.

The Hong Kong Journalists Association (HKJA) received 15 complaints that the police had obstructed news coverage and ignored them even after identifying themselves. HKJA urgently called on the Chief Executive to intervene.

June 13

Queensway was fully open at 5:40 am.

The eastbound lanes of Harcourt Road were fully open at 7:45 am.

After an 18-hour shutdown, Admiralty Station was reopened at 2:20 pm.

The Hospital Authority said at 5 pm that 81 people aged 15 to 66 were injured and sought medical attention at A&E of 7 hospitals, with 2 men in serious condition at one point.

Police

Perceived use of inappropriate violence/behaviour and provocative attitudes

Police deployed

4000

officers

to guard
Legco Complex, Central Government Offices
and vicinity

Weapons

used in dispersal

Huge difference in ammunition figures provided by police

Former Commissioner of Police Andy Tsang Wai-hung, who handled the Umbrella Movement, said that the violence used by the protesters was more serious than that used in the Occupy Movement back then, and that the police had exercised restraint in the use of force. Asked whether the police needed to apologise, he said

I don't want the apology to become endemic. Should the police apologise for carrying out their duties? I think we all know that.

Commissioner of Police Stephen Lo Wai-chung said,

The police showed restraint and followed the guidelines on the use of force, adding that the batons, bean bag rounds, pepper spray, tear gas and rubber bullets used on the day were all less-lethal weapons.

Assaulting
the press

Macau reporter peppersprayed in the face when rinsing wound

White-shirt cop dashed and sneak-attacked press from height

French journalist: "Stop shooting the journalists!"

Raptors shovelled CRHK reporter: "Reporter, my ass!"

The 17 cases collected by the Hong Kong Journalists Association from frontline reporters show that police officers not only failed to comply with the Police General Orders, but also used violence and foul language to obstruct news coverage, causing bodily harm to journalists and seriously undermining the freedom of the press and the public's right to know as enshrined in the Basic Law. The cases of abusing authority include:

- 4 cases of firing tear gas at journalists at close range, one of which caused bodily harm
- 2 cases of beatings with batons, causing bodily harm to journalists- A number of cases of pushing and dispersing journalists with shields, resulting in injury to a journalist
- A number of cases where batons were used to intimidate journalists to prevent them from filming the arrest of protesters by police officers
- Several cases of unreasonable body searches to prevent journalists from covering news

It is noteworthy that all the victims of these abuses had clear identification of the journalists on their bodies, raising doubts as to whether individual police officers were targeting journalists.

Civil Rights Observer report reveals police's use of excessive and illegal force

The police's sudden disperse of lawful assembly, almost resulting in stampedes. The Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF) received the police's Letter of No Objection prior to the assembly at Lung Wui Road. 12 witnesses confirmed that the police fired numerous tear gas rounds at both ends of the road within a very short time with no prior warning. Hundreds of participants were surrounded and rushed into CITIC Tower escaping the tear gas. Interviewees on the fifth floor of CITIC tower at the time were affected by tear gas and suffocated for a few minutes.

Dispersal by force nearly caused stampede

The police's improper use of tear gas. The police fired tear gas rounds targeting citizens at horizontal angles; aimed the tear gas at pedestrians and reporters on footbridges; shot tear gas rounds at protesters presenting no aggressive behaviours; and threw tear gas to media and first-aid stations. At least one citizen was hit by the tear gas round in the abdomen.

The police's assault on subdued protesters and those who did not resist and obviously excessive use of force. As CRO volunteers indicated, a man delivering water near Edinburgh Place was surrounded by police and subdued on the ground. Showing no resistance, he was still hit by the police with batons. A CRO observer also witnessed a protester being subdued and assaulted by the police after he was shot potentially by a rubber bullet. About 30 police officers lined up to block the sight of the media. A protester was assaulted with batons and shields after she was held, with arms bracing her head.

Civil Rights Observer's Report on Police Use of Force on 12 June Protest

CITIC Tower Incident

From 3:47 pm, the police deployed tear gas near the East Wing of and the Legislative Building Complex, on Lung Wui Road in the direction of Performing Arts Avenue, and outside CITIC Tower. In particular, CITIC Tower sustained nearly 30 minutes of continuous bombardment by tear gas.

About 800-1,800 people attempted to cram into CITIC Tower, and I even at a point was squeezed and lifted off the floor for half a second, it was just this crowded. You can imagine that the revolving doors could not function at all. The person next to me yelled like they were about to die, because they had zero gear and took it all in directly. We were both crushed in the middle of the crowd, waiting to get into CITIC Tower. The air was really bad, and I was barely making it through. I could only pray, as I had no idea whether I would suffocate, and I felt really nauseous.Witness Chan Hoi-hing

Witness Chan Hoi Hing

Everyone was really frightened, racing to press the button for the lifts. People then were really anxious and intense, some were quite shaken, while others hurled profanities at the police questioning why they fired shots, and why things were happening that way. Some of the fright and anxiousness were due to the feeling that my life was threatened, and an extreme disappointment in the government. I was actually most afraid of a stampede, or people getting so cramped that we would suffocate. The key was the use of tear gas to herd the people to a dead corner, using tear gas to fill the air and induce panic, and using tear gas to make people crowd together even tighter and intentionally disregard the risk of triggering a stampede. It was blatantly clear that someone in the crowd had an asthma attack but tear gas usage did not stop; the CITIC Tower Incident was a collective murder.

Witness Miss C

After arriving at the top floor, everyone was cramped close together, and then I began to feel quite stuffy and had trouble breathing. Then, the tear gas rushed into CITIC Tower and floated quickly to the top floor. Everyone’s reaction was to get on their hands and knees as if in a fire, but there were too many people and too much tear gas, so the situation did not really improve. I felt hard of breathing, then my nose stung and my eyes teared; eventually, even my skin began to sting with pain, and I heard someone experiencing an asthma attack.

Witness Angus

The lobby of CITIC Tower was filled with protesters using saline to flush their eyes, causing many people who ran into the building to slip, and the scene was quite chaotic. I at first wanted to find my girlfriend, but I could not get through to her on the phone and things were just too chaotic, and I was feeling quite distressed; those police officers really wanted us to die!

Witness Man Jai

"The fundamental human rights of participants shall be respected and protected, even if an assembly is considered unlawful by the authorities."

"Law enforcement officials should recall that heavy displays of less-lethal equipment may escalate tensions during assemblies."

"Before approving dispersal, law enforcement agencies should seek to identify any violent individuals and isolate them from the other participants. This may enable the main assembly to continue."

"Weapons such as chemical irritants dispersed at a distance (tear gas) should be targeted at groups of violent individuals unless it is lawful in the circumstances to disperse the entire assembly. Such use should accord due consideration to the impact on other non-violent participants or bystanders."

"In addition, participants in the assembly should be given time to obey the warning and a safe space or route for them to move to shall be ensured."

"The use of firearms to disperse an assembly is always unlawful."

"…when the use of any less-lethal weapons or related equipment against assembly participants is envisaged, due attention should be paid to the potential for panic in a crowd, including the risk of a stampede."

Injuries

At least 81 injured
and sought
medical attention
at A&E

7 hospitals,
Hospital Authority data shows

57 male

24 female

aged

15 - 66

2 in serious condition

Male teacher in DGS was shot in his right eye and chest with visual ability seriously impaired. Police fired shots without raising black banner warning.

Rubber bullet injured a man's face and left a 3cm scar, requiring at least 6 stitches..

Tear gas canister hit injured man, with mouth and nose bleeding, eyes rolled and body spasmed

Outsourced RTHK driver was hit by tear gas and his heart stopped beating at one point. He had skin irritation all over his body and pus running from his abdomen, ears and soles of his feet.

Hospital

Hospital Authority was questioned about leaking patient particulars to the police. It was revealed that anyone could access patient information without logging in and that there was a dedicated section for the police to access patient particulars. A number of frontline medical staff at public hospitals revealed that the hospital management replied in writing in the evening, insisting that the system had to be logged in to access the information. Meeting the press at 11:00 pm, HA said there are two versions of Accident and Emergency Information System (AEIS), the old one sharing the same password for the whole A&E department, so there is no way to trace who has accessed the patients' records.

On 12 June, Tsuen Wan Adventist Hospital refused to treat a protester injured in the clash in Admiralty, and took the initiative to report the whereabouts of a protester injured in the clash in Admiralty. The protester was eventually arrested in Yan Chai Hospital in Tsuen Wan and charged with "rioting". The incident aroused public concern and Tsuen Wan Adventist Hospital was criticised for betraying the privacy of patients seeking medical treatment.

She used the analogy of mother-son relationship to describe her inability to meet the "wayward demands" of young people. When asked about the opposition's criticism of "selling out" Hong Kong and their demand for her to step down, tearful Carrie Lam stressed that Hong Kong is her birthplace and she has made many sacrifices for the place. In the end, she called on the protesters to solve the problem in a peaceful, rational and law-abiding manner.

Interview with TVB at 8:30am, when the occupy movement broke out. Interview was on air in the evening.

CUHK Sociology Professor Susanne Choi Yuk-ping, barristers Linda Wong Shui-hung and Debora Poon Suk-ying, as Hong Kong mothers, have the following responses to Carrie Lam's "mother-son metaphor".

We are a group of Hong Kong mothers, but we will never attack our children with tear gas, lethal rubber bullets and bean bag rounds. We will not see young people bleeding under the batons and remain indifferent.

The people are not your children, CE, and they do not need your charity, as long as you, as the head of the SAR, as a public servant, listen to the voices of all sides and respond in an appropriate and timely manner.

How arrogant does one have to be to think that the demands of 1.03 million people are "wayward"?

How arrogant does one have to be to think that the concerns of 3,000 legal professionals are "wayward"...

At a press conference on 15 June, she announced the suspension of the amendment bill, added that she felt "deep sorrow and regret" about what happened, and "will adopt the most sincere and humble attitude to accept criticisms". At the same time, she said that the police had acted with restraint, saying that it was "a matter of course" and "just" for police officers to enforce the law. She supported defining the incident as a "riot".

The press release on 16 June mentioned "The Government reiterated that there is no timetable for restarting the process.", and that would mean the extradition law amendment bill has died naturally and can be understood as "a withdrawal". Sources said the Chief Executive has put aside her airs and graces and apologised, and she hoped protesters would disperse as soon as possible. Her attempt failed to appease the public and continued to escalate the protests.

林鄭月娥

She strongly condemned the "riot" and said it was a heartbreaking breach of public peace. She said the incident was a breach of the peace and a disregard for law and order. The incident was described 3 times as a "riotous act", which cannot be tolerated in any civilised society under the rule of law. The content did not mention the demand to withdraw the amendment.

Televised speech at about 8:00 pm

Investigative Documentaries

【經緯線】金鐘612

【鏗鏘集】讓聲音聽得見

【鏗鏘集】612/721的傷口

【HK01】重組612衝突時序

612警民衝突,警方清場手法受到爭議,事件定性亦起紛爭。示威者是否暴徒、警方有否濫用武力,雙方各執一詞。今集《經緯線》將衝突當日拍攝到新聞片段,按時間地點,重新整理一次,嘗試盡量還原真相。社會有呼聲要求成立獨立調查委員會,現時監察警隊執法的機制,為何未能令示威者信服?

《逃犯條例》的審議,如何成為政府管治的一大危機?鏗鏘集記錄過去一星期的社會變化以及市民的心底話,希望讓聲音聽得見。

政府二月推出修訂《逃犯條例》,社會上的反應不一,而在過去一星期,香港人更在沉默中爆發,在六月九日上街遊行,市民穿起白衣,抗議香港政府修訂逃犯條例,不過,政府在遊行一小時後,發表聲明宣佈如期二讀審議。

六月十二日有市民罷工罷市,不少群眾更到立法會示威,最終演變成警民衝突,下午警方發放了布袋彈、橡膠子彈、催淚彈等,更將事件定性為「暴動」,引起社會很大爭議,至六月十五日特首林鄭月娥,宣布暫緩修訂《逃犯條例》。

民陣對政府「只緩不撤」表明不收貨,十六日如期舉行第四次反修例遊行,成為史上最多香港市民參與的遊行,政府新聞處晚上八時半發聲明表示,特首承認因政府工作上不足,令香港社會出現很大的矛盾和紛爭,令很多市民感到失望和痛心,為此向市民致歉。

反逃犯條例引發連串示威抗議,6月12日警方施放150枚催淚彈,20發布袋彈,及未有公布實際數字的橡膠子彈。外界關注,警方是否用了不合乎比例的武器;是否採用過度武力。政府官員表示,示威者可以向監警會投訴。

不過,612中,遭警方過度使用武力對待的傷者,傷勢仍未康復,有傷者更有心理上的後遺症。他們未敢向監警會投訴,擔心投訴資料會成為警方控告他們的罪證。公眾要求政府成立一個獨立調查委員會,徹底調查事件前因後果。

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